Wildflowers in March

Jasminium mesnyi:

Identification help Dr. Gurcharan Singh http://groups.google.com/group/indiantreepix

Not really in the category of wild flowers, but I could not resist putting in this  Apart from being a beautiful flower, this creeper/vine is used a lot to stabilize banks on road cuts. Is drought tolerant and grows well if in full sun to part shade. The beauty of this flower offsets the fact that I have not been able to really find any other use for it except as hedges or fences…. But of course it is not the plants fault.. it is my own ignorance that I do not know of it’s hidden qualities…

Gentiana depressa:

Identification help Dr. Gurcharan Singh http://groups.google.com/group/indiantreepix

Geranium lucidum:

Identification help Dr. Gurcharan Singh http://groups.google.com/group/indiantreepix/

The plant is diuretic and astringent

ref: http://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Geranium%20lucidum

Nasturtium officinale:

Identification help Dr. Gurcharan Singh http://groups.google.com/group/indiantreepix/

Watercress is very rich in vitamins and minerals, and has long been valued as a food and medicinal plant. Considered a cleansing herb, its high content of vitamin C makes it a remedy that is particularly valuable for chronic illnesses. The leaves are antiscorbutic, depurative, diuretic, expectorant, purgative, hypoglycaemic, odontalgic, stimulant and stomachic. The plant has been used as a specific in the treatment of TB. The freshly pressed juice has been used internally and externally in the treatment of chest and kidney complaints, chronic irritations and inflammations of the skin etc. Applied externally, it has a long-standing reputation as an effective hair tonic, helping to promote the growth of thick hair. A poultice of the leaves is said to be an effective treatment for healing glandular tumours or lymphatic swellings. Some caution is advised, excessive use of the plant can lead to stomach upsets. The leaves can be harvested almost throughout the year and are used fresh.

ref: http://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Nasturtium%20officinale

Salix caprea:

Identification help Dr. Gurcharan Singh http://groups.google.com/group/indiantreepix/

 

The fresh bark of all members of this genus contains salicin, which probably decomposes into salicylic acid (closely related to aspirin) in the human body. This is used as an anodyne and febrifuge. A decoction of the leaves is used in the treatment of fevers. A distilled water from the flowers is aphrodisiac, cordial and stimulant. It is used externally in the treatment of headaches and ophthalmia. The ashes of the wood are useful in the treatment of haemoptysis. The stems and the leaves are astringent. A gum and the juice of the trees are used to increase visual powers.

ref: http://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Salix%20caprea

Veronica polita:

Identification help Dr. Gurcharan Singh http://groups.google.com/group/indiantreepix/

 

A decoction of the plant is used in the treatment of dysmenorrhoea and metrorrhagia. It is also edible and the young leaves and stem can be cooked.

ref: http://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Veronica%20polita

Vicia sativa:

Identification help Dr. Gurcharan Singh http://groups.google.com/group/indiantreepix/

Seed – cooked. Not very palatable nor very digestible but it is very nutritious. The seed can be dried, ground into a powder and mixed with cereal flour to make bread, biscuits, cakes etc. The beans compliment the protein in the cereal making it more complete. Leaves, young shoots and young pods – cooked. The leaves are a tea substitute.

ref: http://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Vicia%20sativa

Arabidopsis thaliana:

The plant is used to cure sores in the mouth

ref: http://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Arabidopsis%20thaliana

Medicago polymorpha var. polymorpha:


Leaves and young shoots – raw or cooked as a potherb. Only the young leaves are eaten raw. Plants can be harvested on a cut and come again basis, the first harvest can be made about one month after sowing, plants can then be harvested another 3 – 4 times at intervals of a few weeks. The young leaves contain about 6% protein, 0.14% fat, 9.5% carbohydrate, 1.4% ash. They are rich in vitamins A, C, and E. Flowers – raw or cooked. Seed – cooked. The seed can be parched, ground into a powder and mixed with water to make a mush.

ref: http://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Medicago%20polymorpha

Sonchus asper:

Identification help Dr. Gurcharan Singh http://groups.google.com/group/indiantreepix/

The plant is pounded and applied as a poultice to wounds and boils. Also is used as food. Tender young leaves and stem tops – raw or cooked. They can be added to salads or used like spinach. The young leaves have a mild agreeable flavour. The stems should be bruised and the bitter-tasting milky juice washed out before eating or cooking them. The stems have been peeled and eaten raw like celery.

Vinca major:


The plant is astringent, bitter, detergent, sedative, stomachic and tonic. It contains the alkaloid ‘vincamine’, which is used by the pharmaceutical industry as a cerebral stimulant and vasodilator. It also contains ‘reserpine’, which reduces high blood pressure. It is used internally in the treatment of excessive menstruation, abnormal uterine bleeding, vaginal discharge and hardening of the arteries. It should not be given to patients with constipation. It is applied externally to vaginal discharge, nosebleed, sore throat and mouth ulcers. The plants are cut when flowering and dried for later use. The fresh flowers are gently purgative, but lose their effect on drying. A homeopathic remedy is made from the fresh leaves. It is used in the treatment of haemorrhages.

ref: http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Vinca%20major

Cardamine impatiens:

Identification help Dr. Gurcharan Singh http://groups.google.com/group/indiantreepix

Leaves and young shoots – raw or cooked. Used as a vegetable.

The plants is antirheumatic, diuretic and stimulant

ref: http://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Cardamine%20impatiens

Rhododendron arboreum:

Rhododendron arboreum

The young leaves are astringent and poultice. They are made into a pasteand then applied to the forehead in the treatment of headaches. The juice of the bark is used in the treatment of coughs, diarrhoea and dysentery. A decoction of the flowers is used to check a tendency to vomit, especially if there is also a loss of appetite. The juice of the flowers is used in the treatment of menstrual disorders. The petals are eaten to assist the removal of any animal bones that have become stuck in the throat.

Pseudomertensia nemerosa

pseudomertensia nemerosa

Calanthe plantigenia:

Identification help Dr. Pankaj Kumar http://groups.google.com/group/indiantreepix

No Medicinal use found for this ‘Orchid’, but I am deeply grateful to this plant which was the first one I had tried to identify. It was after a year and a half of searching that finally Dr. Pankaj Kumar (Efloraindia) helped me to identify it as ‘Calanthe plantigenia’. It was a great learning process and an enriching experience…

Daphne papyracea

Daphne papyracea

The plant is said to be bitter, febrifuge and purgative. (Not that I am a medicinal plant expert….)

Ref: http://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Daphne%20papyracea

Buddleja crispa

Buddleja crispa

There are studies being conducted regarding the antihypertensive and antispasmodic properties of this plant… (which might explain why the butterflies go wild over these species)

Ref: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19067391

Geranium ocellatum

Geranium ocellatum

The plant is astringent and diuretic. The juice of the plant is used to treat amoebic dysentery

Ref: http://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Geranium%20ocellatum

Ainsliaea aptera

Identification help Dr. Gurcharan Singh http://groups.google.com/group/indiantreepix

Diuretic (50% EtOH extract of plant); antispasmodic and antipyretic (root).

Ref: http://www.impgc.com/plantinfo_A.php?id=390

Campanula pallida var. pallida

Campanula pallida var. pallida

Gentiana capitata

Gentiana capitata

Trifolium repens

Trifolium repens

The plant is antirheumatic, antiscrophulatic, depurative, detergent and tonic. An infusion has been used in the treatment of coughs, colds, fevers and leucorrhoea. A tincture of the leaves is applied as an ointment to gout. An infusion of the flowers has been used as an eyewash.

Ref: http://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Trifolium%20repens

Idenidentification help Dr. Gurcharan Singh http://groups.google.com/group/indiantreepix

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: