Wildflowers in February

Viola serpens

Viola serpens

Ethnomedicinal uses: The flowers are grinded in milk and applied on throat problems. The tea containing the flowers of this plant is used against cough and cold.

ref: http://www.ethnoleaflets.com/leaflets/kistwar.htm

Valeriana hardwickii:

Valeriana hardwickii: identification help by Dr. Gurcharan Singh http://indiantreepix.googlegroups.com/

The root is bitter, carminative, diuretic, expectorant, nervine and stimulant. It is used as a nerve tonic and in the treatment of conditions such as epilepsy and hysteria. It is also used in the treatment of rheumatism and low blood pressure. The pounded rot or leaves are used as a poultice to treat boils. The plant is antispasmodic, aphrodisiac, emmenagogue, diaphoretic and stimulant. This plant is an effective substitute for V. officinalis. The uses of that plant are as follows:- Valerian is a well-known and frequently used medicinal herb that has a long and proven history of efficacy. It is noted especially for its effect as a tranquilliser and nervine, particularly for those people suffering from nervous overstrain. Valerian has been shown to encourage sleep, improve sleep quality and reduce blood pressure. It is also used internally in the treatment of painful menstruation, cramps, hypertension, irritable bowel syndrome etc. It should not be prescribed for patients with liver problems. Externally, it is used to treat eczema, ulcers and minor injuries. The root is antispasmodic, carminative, diuretic, hypnotic, powerfully nervine, sedative and stimulant. The active ingredients are called valepotriates, research has confirmed that these have a calming effect on agitated people, but are also a stimulant in cases of fatigue. The roots of 2 year old plants are harvested in the autumn once the leaves have died down and are used fresh or dried. The fresh root is about 3 times as effective as roots dried at 40C, whilst temperatures above 82C destroy the active principle in the root.

ref: http://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Valeriana%20hardwickii

Berginia ciliata:

Berginia ciliata

A juice or powder of the whole plant is used to treat urinary troubles in Nepal. The juice of the leaves is used as drops to relieve earaches. The root is used as a tonic in the treatment of fevers, diarrhoea and pulmonary affections. The root juice is used to treat coughs and colds, haemorrhoids, asthma and urinary problems. Externally, the root is bruised and applied as a poultice to boils and ophthalmia, it is also considered helpful in relieving backache. The root of this plant has a high reputation in indigenous systems of medicine for dissolving stones in the kidneys.

ref: http://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Bergenia%20ciliata

Veronica persica:

Veronica persica

Clears sinus congestion. Eases eye soreness and helps eyesight. Goes to areas of tension, specifically the neck and shoulder areas and relaxes the muscles.

ref: http://healthyhomegardening.com/Plant.php?pid=2129

Cerastium fontanum

Cerastium fontanum:identification help by Dr. Gurcharan Singh http://indiantreepix.googlegroups.com/

Edible: Leaves – raw or cooked. Leaves and young stems – cooked.

ref: http://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Cerastium%20fontanum

Stellaria media or Chickweed:

Stellaria media: identification help by Dr. Gurcharan Singh http://indiantreepix.googlegroups.com/

It has a very long history of herbal use, being particularly beneficial in the external treatment of any kind of itching skin condition.It has been known to soothe severe itchiness even where all other remedies have failed. In excess doses chickweed can cause diarrhoea and vomiting. It should not be used medicinally by pregnant women. The whole plant is astringent, carminative, demulcent, diuretic, expectorant, laxative, refrigerant, vulnerary. Taken internally it is useful in the treatment of chest complaints and in small quantities it also aids digestion. It can be applied as a poultice and will relieve any kind of roseola and is effective wherever there are fragile superficial veins. An infusion of the fresh or dried herb can be added to the bath water and its emollient property will help to reduce inflammation – in rheumatic joints for example – and encourage tissue repair. Chickweed is best harvested between May and July, it can be used fresh or be dried and stored for later use. A decoction of the whole plant is taken internally as a post-partum depurative, emmenagogue, galactogogue and circulatory tonic. It is also believed to relieve constipation and be beneficial in the treatment of kidney complaints. The decoction is also used externally to treat rheumatic pains, wounds and ulcers. The expressed juice of the plant has been used as an eyewash.

ref: http://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Stellaria%20media

Rubus ellipticus:

Rubus ellipticus

The plant is astringent and febrifuge. A decoction of the root, combined with Girardinia diversifolia root and the bark of Lagerstroemia parviflora, is used in the treatment of fevers. The juice of the root is used in the treatment of fevers, gastric troubles, diarrhoea and dysentery. A paste of the roots is applied externally to wounds. Both the roots and the young shoots are considered to be a good treatment for colic. The leaf buds, combined with Centella asiatica and Cynodon dactylon, are pounded to a juice and used in the treatment of peptic ulcers. The juice of the fruit is used in the treatment of fever, colic, coughs and sore throat. The inner bark is used in Tibetan medicine, it is said to have a sweet and sour flavour plus a heating potency. A renal tonic and antidiuretic, it is used in the treatment of weakening of the senses, vaginal/seminal discharge, polyuria and micturation during sleep.

ref: http://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Rubus%20ellipticus

Valeriana jatamansii:

Valeriana jatamansii: identification help by Amit Chauhan http://indiantreepix.googlegroups.com/

The root is antispasmodic, carminative and stimulant. It has many of the properties of V. officinalis and could therefore be employed as a nervine and sedative. It is used in Nepal to treat hysteria, insomna, nausea, pimples, rheumatism and cholera. The juice of the root is applied to the forehead in the treatment of headaches, and is dripped into the eyes for treating eye problems. A paste of the plant is applied externally to boils. This species is an effective substitute for V. officinalis. The uses of that plant are as follows:- Valerian is a well-known and frequently used medicinal herb that has a long and proven history of efficacy. It is noted especially for its effect as a tranquilliser and nervine, particularly for those people suffering from nervous overstrain. Valerian has been shown to encourage sleep, improve sleep quality and reduce blood pressure. It is also used internally in the treatment of painful menstruation, cramps, hypertension, irritable bowel syndrome etc. It should not be prescribed for patients with liver problems. Externally, it is used to treat eczema, ulcers and minor injuries. The root is antispasmodic, carminative, diuretic, hypnotic, powerfully nervine, sedative and stimulant. The active ingredients are called valepotriates, research has confirmed that these have a calming effect on agitated people, but are also a stimulant in cases of fatigue. The roots of 2 year old plants are harvested in the autumn once the leaves have died down and are used fresh or dried. The fresh root is about 3 times as effective as roots dried at 40° (the report does not specify if this is centigrade or fahrenheit), whilst temperatures above 82° destroy the active principle in the root. Use with caution, see the notes above on toxicity.

ref: http://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Valeriana%20jatamansii

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2 Responses

  1. How come you haven’t got the Foxgloves in as yet? They were my favorite flowers – used to collect a few for my vase!

    • Hey Pintz,
      I have about a hundred wild flowers identified till now.. but I am presenting them month-wise as well as trying to take better photos.. so that others can use them too for identification in this place. There are two varieties of foxgloves here..
      I have both photographs but you’ll see them when I make the folders for June-July.. 🙂
      Alok

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