Kalatope Moths – Zygaenidae, Drepanidae & Lasiocampidae

Credits first: Thankful to Dr. Roger Kendrick and Peter Smetacek for leading me to these identifications and helping me to learn about moths, as also to the members of the facebook groups… who through their constant appreciation and ‘likes’ made it a special exercise to present the variety of moths found at Kalatope Wildlife Sanctuary…

Please DO report any errors found on these pages through the comment box…

Check-list of Kalatope Moths – Families ‘Zygaenidae, Drepanidae & Lasiocampidae’

FAMILY

SUB-FAMILY

TRIBE

SPECIES

Zygaenidae

Chalcosiinae

Chalcosiini

Campylotes histrionicus – Westwood, 1839

Zygaenidae

Chalcosiinae

Chalcosiini

Chalcosia pectinicornis – Linnaeus, 1758

Zygaenidae

Chalcosiinae

Chalcosiini

Soritia puchella – Kollar, 1844

Zygaenidae

Chalcosiinae

Chalcosiini

Soritia puchella complex – Kollar, 1844

Zygaenidae

Procridinae

Artonini

Artona (=BALATAEA) zebraica – Butler, 1876

Zygaenidae

Procridinae

Artonini

Artona quadrimaculata – Moore, 1879

Drepanidae

Drepaninae

Drepanini

Agnidra discispilaria – Moore, 1868

Drepanidae

Drepaninae

Drepanini

Drepana pallida, Moore, 1879

Drepanidae

Drepaninae

Drepanini

Macrauzata fenestraria, Moore, 1868

Drepanidae

Drepaninae

Drepanini

Macrocilix mysticata – Walker, 1863

Drepanidae

Drepaninae

Oretini

Oreta sp. Walker, 1855 (c.f. O.vatama)

Drepanidae

Thyatirinae

Thyatirini

Thyatira batis, Linnaeus, 1758

Drepanidae

Thyatirinae

 

Habrosyne sp. Hübner, 1821 (c.f. H.indica)

Drepanidae

Drepaninae

 

Auzata sp. Walker, 1863 (c.f. A.semipavonaria)

Drepanidae

Drepaninae

 

Callidrepana patrana – Moore, 1866

 

Lasiocampidae

Lasiocampinae

Pinarini

Lebeda sp – Walker, 1855 (c.f. L. nobilis)

Lasiocampidae

Lasiocampinae

Pinarini

Dendrolimus sp. – Germar, 1812 (c.f. D. cheela)

Lasiocampidae

Lasiocampinae

Pinarini

Kunugia lineata – Moore, 1879

Lasiocampidae

Lasiocampinae

Pinarini

Paralebeda plagifera – Walker, 1855

Lasiocampidae

Lasiocampinae

Trabalini

Trabala vishnou – Lefèbvre, 1827

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Kalatope Moths – Family ‘Crambidae’

I am fortunate to be staying in a place where an abundance of flora and fauna is found, added to this, the luck of coming across the helpful community of ‘IndianMoths’ on Facebook, which has helped me understand and identify the Moth species I have come across. The members of this group like Dr. Roger Kendrick, Peter Smatacek, Sachin Gurule, Shubhalaxmi Vaylure… (and the list goes on) have supported my queries and continue guiding me in this field……

Presenting the check-list of the ‘Crambidae’ family of Moths from Kalatope. To see the images in this list, please click on it and the image page will open…

Please DO point out errors or suggestions for these pages in the comments box..

Kalatope Moths – Check-list of the ‘Crambidae’ Family

FAMILY

SUB-FAMILY

TRIBE

SPECIES

Crambidae

Acentropinae

 

Eoophyla sejunctalis, Snellen 1876

Crambidae

Crambinae

Crambini

Crambus sp, Fabricius, 1798

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

Bradina diagonalis, Guenee 1854

Crambidae

Pyraustinae

 

Pyrausta sp, Schrank, 1802

Crambidae

Schoeonobiinae

 

Scirpophaga sp. Treitschke 1832

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

c.f. Omiodes analis

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

Agathodes ostentalis, Geyer, 1837

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

Conogethes punctiferalis, Guenée, 1854

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

Cotachena sp. Moore 1885 (c.f. pubescens)

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

 

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

Herpetogramma luctuosalis, Bremer, 1864

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

Lamprosema commixta, Butler, 1873

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

Leucinodes orbonalis, Guenée, 1854

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

Maruca vitrata, Fabricius, 1787

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

Nomophila noctuella, Denis & Schiffermüller, 1775

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

Omiodes sp. – Guenée, 1854

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

Polythlipta cerealis Lederer, 1863

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

Pygospila tyres, Cramer, 1780

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

Spoladea recurvalis, Fabricius, 1775

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

Syngamia falsidicalis, Walker, 1859

Crambidae

Scopariinae

 

maybe Scoparia or Eudonia sp

Crambidae

Evergestinae

 

Crocidolomia pavonana – Fabricius, 1794

Crambidae

Acentropiinae

 

Eoophyla sp – Swinhoe, 1900

Moths of Kalatope – Family ‘Noctuidae’

Presenting the ‘Noctuidae’ family of the Kalatope Moths collection.

Each part of this collection bears thanks to Dr. Roger Kendrick and Peter Smetacek, who have played a major role in increasing my interest in the study of Moths in Kalatope.

The check-list is hyper-linked to the page with the images mentioned in this check-list… Please DO comment, if you spot any errors or id’s in this list…

Check-list of Kalatope Moths – Family ‘Noctuidae’

FAMILY

SUB-FAMILY

TRIBE

SPECIES

Noctuidae

Acronictinae

 

Auchmis inextricata – Moore, 1881

Noctuidae

Acronictinae

 

Nacna malachitis (Oberthur, 1880)

Noctuidae

Amphipyrinae

 

Unknown sp.

Noctuidae

Cuculliinae

 

Unknown sp.

Noctuidae

Eriopinae

 

Callopistria repleta – Walker, 1858

Noctuidae

Eriopinae

 

Callopistria sp. – Hübner, 1821 (c.f. placodoides)

Noctuidae

Noctuinae

Prodeniini

Spodoptera litura – Fabricius, 1775

Noctuidae

Heliothinae

 

Pyrrhia sp. – Hübner, 1821

Noctuidae

Noctuinae

Dypterigini

Trachea auriplena – Walker, 1857

Noctuidae

Noctuinae

Leucaniini

Mythimna sp. – Ochsenheimer, 1816

Noctuidae

Noctuinae

Phlogophorini

Conservula indica (Moore, 1867)

Noctuidae

Noctuinae

Noctuini

Agrotis sp – Ochsenheimer, 1816

Noctuidae

Noctuinae

Noctuini

Dichagyris sp – Lederer, 1857

Noctuidae

Noctuinae

 

Axylia renalis – Moore, 1881

Noctuidae

Noctuinae

Noctuini

Xestia sp. – Hübner, 1818

Noctuidae

Pantheinae

 

Arcte coerulea – Guenée, 1852

Noctuidae

Pantheinae

 

Trichosea sp – Grote, 1875 (c.f. T. champa)

Noctuidae

Plusiinae

 

Thysanoplusia intermixta – Warren, 1913

Noctuidae

Plusiinae

 

Thysanoplusia orichalcea – Fabricius, 1775

Noctuidae

   

Unknown sp.

Noctuidae

Plusiinae

 

Chrysodeixis sp – Hübner, [1821

Noctuidae

Pantheinae

 

Unknown sp.

Noctuidae

Eustrotiinae

 

Maliattha sp – Walker, 1863

Noctuidae

Calpinae

 

Eudocima tyrannus – Guenée, 1852

Noctuidae

Hadeninae

Apameini

possibly a Feliniopsis sp

 

A wild tale (tail)….

Wishes do come true sometimes….!! Don’t they..??

Recently, I was gifted a new camera… like a dream come true… Good zoom capabilities.. nothing very fancy but at the same time just about right for my amateurish capabilities…

Early next morning, I woke up with a hope of getting some good wildlife photographs. Creeping out of the house silently, I went out to try my luck… suddenly I heard the clicking sound of a ‘Grey Goral‘ a wild goat-antelope (Naemorhedus goral)…..

Usually the Goral (which has very sharp hearing) would be wary and bound off at the slightest sound. Even the sound of a camera 200 metres away is enough to warn it. And as luck would have it .. I saw it as soon as I stepped out of my house… but true to it’s capabilities, it heard my camera’s sound and with a snort it bounded off down the steep slope below our house… with a curse I went around trying to locate it.. but, it was of no use…

I came back dejected and was about to go in the house when I spotted another one bounding down the slope.. quick as a flash I whipped up the camera and took a photo.. my hands were still not very steady with the camera (it is rather heavy for a point-and-shoot) but with the good zooming capabilities I could get a clear shot even at that distance…. I was PLEASED… !! Till now I had never managed to get a good photo of a Goral…

By this time it had bounded down the slope… I sneaked ahead hoping to catch another sight of it when I heard a rustle below me in the bushes… and I saw it there hiding behind the barberry bushes… it was a baby Goral…

Seeing me it ran off towards the other end of the field and I thought that I had lost it… for Gorals are very fast and can jump off a steep slope without a thought and disappear really fast… but then it stopped and turned back as if in answer to my prayers…. for the next ten minutes I stood there mesmerised watching it’s antics where it stomped it’s feet as if to warn me to stay away and tried to appear menacing with its clicking sound (which actually sound like hiccups)… finally we parted ways.. it going to it’s wild domain and me back to my lair…

Thankfully I did manage to remember to take a few photographs.. and as I returned back home.. I did remember that sometimes wishes are answered….

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The lesser known ‘lichenworld’….

Everyone knows about birds, bees, animals, flowers, trees….. some even study them, identify them and glorify them…. but…  few people have gone into the study of ‘fungi‘ and even fewer into the world of ‘lichens‘. On the Indian side… very little data to be found on the internet.. our botanists and scientists, hold this information as valuable and closely guard the secrets… Which is why I decided to post the species I find on the blog.. to let people see what is found here..

Cladonia scabriuscula

‘Fungi’, the better known cousins of ‘lichens’ are still commonly identified.. as the bread goes ‘mouldy’ or the damp and rotting clothes, wood etc. with ‘fungus’, or for those with a taste for finer things… delicacies like, ‘chanterelle‘, ‘boletes‘ or ‘morels‘…. but ‘Lichens‘……

I would not like to go into the detailed explanations of lichens (not qualified enough)… instead let it suffice that I went into observing lichens.. as I was studying fungi. And when the winters arrived… there were very few fungi to be seen around… and THEN.. I discovered lichens. Perhaps the same way as the wild animals do…. when in winters there is very less fresh food around, especially in the snowbound areas… or even deserts… they survive on lichens… Of course to my interest was the fact that they are also an indicator of the health of any eco-system… which made me interested to find out which types of lichens grow here in Kalatope-Khajjiar Wildlife Sanctuary.. an indicator of the true health of this forest.. is it as pristine as they say..?? The amazing thing is that they can grow on almost about any surface… the one’s I found growing on wood, had cousins growing on hard rock too.. and I’ve even seen documentary evidence of it growing on plastic… maybe there is a scope that they do not just recycle nitrogen .. but plastic too… Hey..!! Who knows..?? Someday…

Some local women here told me that they had heard about lichens being used medicinally in ‘old’ times… but that knowledge is lost now to the modern generations… however there are records in other parts of the world about lichens being used as medicine also as in Russia, for treating wounds. Of course American tribes used it as food also (not as tasty as morels) but good for soups, Egyptians in bread, turkish in jellies, and of course the wild animals used it for survival.. with its high carbohydrate diet…

The photos of (only lichens) I am putting in the albums of ‘Lichen & Fungi of Kalatope-Khajjiar’ are not necessarily growing during the given periods.. but are classified according to when I found them. Actually, lichens actually grow very slowly, it is said some only a millimetre or two in a year and some even thought to be the oldest living things on earth.

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