Kalatope Moths – Zygaenidae, Drepanidae & Lasiocampidae

Credits first: Thankful to Dr. Roger Kendrick and Peter Smetacek for leading me to these identifications and helping me to learn about moths, as also to the members of the facebook groups… who through their constant appreciation and ‘likes’ made it a special exercise to present the variety of moths found at Kalatope Wildlife Sanctuary…

Please DO report any errors found on these pages through the comment box…

Check-list of Kalatope Moths – Families ‘Zygaenidae, Drepanidae & Lasiocampidae’

FAMILY

SUB-FAMILY

TRIBE

SPECIES

Zygaenidae

Chalcosiinae

Chalcosiini

Campylotes histrionicus – Westwood, 1839

Zygaenidae

Chalcosiinae

Chalcosiini

Chalcosia pectinicornis – Linnaeus, 1758

Zygaenidae

Chalcosiinae

Chalcosiini

Soritia puchella – Kollar, 1844

Zygaenidae

Chalcosiinae

Chalcosiini

Soritia puchella complex – Kollar, 1844

Zygaenidae

Procridinae

Artonini

Artona (=BALATAEA) zebraica – Butler, 1876

Zygaenidae

Procridinae

Artonini

Artona quadrimaculata – Moore, 1879

Drepanidae

Drepaninae

Drepanini

Agnidra discispilaria – Moore, 1868

Drepanidae

Drepaninae

Drepanini

Drepana pallida, Moore, 1879

Drepanidae

Drepaninae

Drepanini

Macrauzata fenestraria, Moore, 1868

Drepanidae

Drepaninae

Drepanini

Macrocilix mysticata – Walker, 1863

Drepanidae

Drepaninae

Oretini

Oreta sp. Walker, 1855 (c.f. O.vatama)

Drepanidae

Thyatirinae

Thyatirini

Thyatira batis, Linnaeus, 1758

Drepanidae

Thyatirinae

 

Habrosyne sp. Hübner, 1821 (c.f. H.indica)

Drepanidae

Drepaninae

 

Auzata sp. Walker, 1863 (c.f. A.semipavonaria)

Drepanidae

Drepaninae

 

Callidrepana patrana – Moore, 1866

 

Lasiocampidae

Lasiocampinae

Pinarini

Lebeda sp – Walker, 1855 (c.f. L. nobilis)

Lasiocampidae

Lasiocampinae

Pinarini

Dendrolimus sp. – Germar, 1812 (c.f. D. cheela)

Lasiocampidae

Lasiocampinae

Pinarini

Kunugia lineata – Moore, 1879

Lasiocampidae

Lasiocampinae

Pinarini

Paralebeda plagifera – Walker, 1855

Lasiocampidae

Lasiocampinae

Trabalini

Trabala vishnou – Lefèbvre, 1827

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Kalatope Moths – Family ‘Crambidae’

I am fortunate to be staying in a place where an abundance of flora and fauna is found, added to this, the luck of coming across the helpful community of ‘IndianMoths’ on Facebook, which has helped me understand and identify the Moth species I have come across. The members of this group like Dr. Roger Kendrick, Peter Smatacek, Sachin Gurule, Shubhalaxmi Vaylure… (and the list goes on) have supported my queries and continue guiding me in this field……

Presenting the check-list of the ‘Crambidae’ family of Moths from Kalatope. To see the images in this list, please click on it and the image page will open…

Please DO point out errors or suggestions for these pages in the comments box..

Kalatope Moths – Check-list of the ‘Crambidae’ Family

FAMILY

SUB-FAMILY

TRIBE

SPECIES

Crambidae

Acentropinae

 

Eoophyla sejunctalis, Snellen 1876

Crambidae

Crambinae

Crambini

Crambus sp, Fabricius, 1798

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

Bradina diagonalis, Guenee 1854

Crambidae

Pyraustinae

 

Pyrausta sp, Schrank, 1802

Crambidae

Schoeonobiinae

 

Scirpophaga sp. Treitschke 1832

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

c.f. Omiodes analis

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

Agathodes ostentalis, Geyer, 1837

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

Conogethes punctiferalis, Guenée, 1854

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

Cotachena sp. Moore 1885 (c.f. pubescens)

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

 

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

Herpetogramma luctuosalis, Bremer, 1864

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

Lamprosema commixta, Butler, 1873

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

Leucinodes orbonalis, Guenée, 1854

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

Maruca vitrata, Fabricius, 1787

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

Nomophila noctuella, Denis & Schiffermüller, 1775

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

Omiodes sp. – Guenée, 1854

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

Polythlipta cerealis Lederer, 1863

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

Pygospila tyres, Cramer, 1780

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

Spoladea recurvalis, Fabricius, 1775

Crambidae

Spilomelinae

 

Syngamia falsidicalis, Walker, 1859

Crambidae

Scopariinae

 

maybe Scoparia or Eudonia sp

Crambidae

Evergestinae

 

Crocidolomia pavonana – Fabricius, 1794

Crambidae

Acentropiinae

 

Eoophyla sp – Swinhoe, 1900

Kalatope Moths – Family ‘Erebidae’

I’ve spent last few months trying to sort out my moth collection from last year (2011), Dr. Roger Kendrick has been immensely helpful in the classification and identification of the ‘Moths of Kalatope Sanctuary’ and I am very grateful to him for devoting so much time and energy in sorting this collection, during this process Dr. Kendrick also guided me towards the new changes in the taxonomy of moths and helped me classify them in that order…. I am equally grateful to Peter Smetacek for also helping with a lot of identifications. In fact without these two pillars of ‘IndianMoths’ group on Facebook it would have been very difficult to sort this data.

I am presenting a series of check-lists linked to the respective pages (with photographs), starting with the ‘Erebidae‘ family… simply because it was the largest group of moths I found in Kalatope…

Moths of Kalatope Sanctuary – Family ‘Erebidae’

Family

Sub-family

Tribe

Genus/Species

Erebidae

Aganainae

Aganaini

Asota caricae Fabricius,1775

Erebidae

Aganainae

Aganaini

Asota ficus – Fabricius,1775

Erebidae

Aganainae

Aganaini

Asota tortuosa – Moore, 1872

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Arctiini (Callimorphina)

Aglaomorpha plagiata

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Arctiini (Callimorphina)

Callimorpha principalis – Kollar, 1844

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Arctiini (Callimorphina)

Utetheisa pulchelloides – Hampson, 1907

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Arctiini (Spilosomina)

Areas galactina – Hoev., 1840

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Arctiini (Spilosomina)

Areas galactina spp.

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Arctiini (Spilosomina)

Areas imperialis – Kollar 1844

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Arctiini (Spilosomina)

Creatonotos (Phissama) transiens – Walker, 1855

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Arctiini (Spilosomina)

Creatonotos transiens – Walker, 1855

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Arctiini (Spilosomina)

Estigmene quadriramosa – Kollar, 1844

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Arctiini (Spilosomina)

Lemyra (Thyrgorina) unifascia – Walker, 1855

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Arctiini (Spilosomina)

Spilarctia (SPILOSOMA) leopardina – Kollar, 1844

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Arctiini (Spilosomina)

Spilarctia Obliqua – Walker, 1855

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Arctiini (Spilosomina)

Spilosoma sp – Curtis, 1825

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Arctiini (Spilosomina)

Spilosoma sp. – Curtis, 1825

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Lithosiini

Agylla pallens – Hampson, 1894

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Lithosiini

Agylla ramelana – Moore, 1900

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Lithosiini

Chrysorhabdia (Chrysorabdia) bivitta

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Lithosiini

Aemene sp. – Walker, 1854

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Lithosiini

 

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Lithosiini

 

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Lithosiini (Lithosiina)

Dolgma sp

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Lithosiini (Lithosiina)

Eilema depressa – Esper, 1786

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Lithosiini (Nudariina)

Barsine sp – Walker, 1854

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Lithosiini (Nudariina)

Cyana puella – Drury, 1773

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Lithosiini (Nudariina)

Cyana Sp – Walker, 1854

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Syntomini

Amata sp – Fabricius, 1807

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Syntomini

Trichaeta teneiformis – Walker, 1856

Erebidae

Lymantriinae

Lymantriini

Lymantria sp. – H├╝bner, 1819

Erebidae

Arctiinae

   

Erebidae

Boletobiinae

Aventiini

sp.

Erebidae

Boletobiinae

Eublemmini

Eublemma accedens – Felder & Rogenhofer, 1874

Erebidae

Tinoliini

 

Calesia dasypterus – Kollar, 1844

Erebidae

Calpinae

Calpini

Oraesia sp – Guenee, 1852

Erebidae

Erebinae

Catocalini

Catocala sp – Schrank, 1802

Erebidae

Erebinae

Catocalini

Catocala sp – Schrank, 1802

Erebidae

Erebinae

Catocalini

Catocala sp – Schrank, 1802

Erebidae

Erebinae

Erebini

Erebus sp. (glaucopis??) – Latreille, 1810

Erebidae

Erebinae

Ophiusini

Artena dotata – Fabricius, 1794

Erebidae

Erebinae

Ophiusini

Ophiusa tirhaca – Cramer, 1777

Erebidae

Erebinae

Ophiusini

Thyas juno – Dalman, 1823

Erebidae

Erebinae

Poaphilini

Dysgonia – Hubner, 1823

Erebidae

Erebinae

Poaphilini

Grammodes geometrica – Fabricius, 1775

Erebidae

Erebinae

Sypnini

Sypna sp or Hypersypnoides sp

Erebidae

Erebinae

Sypnini

Sypnoides sp – Hampson, 1913

Erebidae

Erebinae

 

Arytrurides inornata – Walker, 1865

Erebidae

Erebinae

Hypopyrini

Spirama retorta – Clerck, 1764

Erebidae

Hypeninae

 

Hypena sp – Schrank, 1802

Erebidae

Herminiinae

 

Adrapsa sp – Walker, 1859

Erebidae

Hypeninae

 

??

Erebidae

Lymantriinae

Arctonithini

Arctornis (=Redoa) comma – Hutton, 1865

Erebidae

Lymantriinae

Lymantriini

Lymantria marginata – Walker, 1855

Erebidae

Lymantriinae

Lymantriini

Lymantria concolor – Walker, 1855

Erebidae

Lymantriinae

Lymantriini

Lymantria sp. – H├╝bner, 1819

Erebidae

Lymantriinae

Nygmiini

Artaxa sp – Walker, 1855

Erebidae

Lymantriinae

Nygmiini

Orvasca subnotata – Walker, 1865

Erebidae

Lymantriinae

Orgyiini

Calliteara sp. – Butler, 1881 (c.f. grotei)

Erebidae

Lymantriinae

Orgyiini

Laelia exclamationis – Kollar, 1848

Erebidae

Lymantriinae

Orgyiini

Laelia sp – Stephens, 1828

Erebidae

Lymantriinae

 

Himala argentea – Walker, 1855

Erebidae

Scoliopteryginae

 

Rusicada (ex Anomis) leucolopha – Prout, 1928

Erebidae

   

sp.

Erebidae

incertae sedis

 

Batracharta irrorata – Hampson, 1894

Erebidae

Lymantriinae

Arctonithini

Arctornis sp – Germar, 1810

Erebidae

Hypeninae

 

Hypena sp – Schrank, 1802

Erebidae

Erebinae

Sypnini

possibly an Hypersypnoides species

Erebidae

Calpinae

 

Cymatophoropsis sinuata – Moore, 1879

Erebidae

Arctiinae

 

Spilarctia (SPILOSOMA) rhodophila Walker, 1864

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Lithosini

Asura sp. – Walker, 1854 (near nebulosa)

Erebidae

Arctiinae

Lithosini

Stigmatophora sp – Staudinger, 1881


 

Out for a walk….

I am not an adventurer or a traveller going to places, where exotic species can be observed.. but every weekend we have made it a habit to go out for a walk into the forest… It does not matter what path we take, for around us is the not so well known ‘Kalatope-Khajjiar Wildlife sanctuary’ and its importance can be gauged by the very fact that the total area of this sanctuary is going to be decreased from 69.7 sq kms to just 11.9 sq kms… The Kalatope sanctuary is primarily a coniferous forest and has a typical vegetation, which is unlike the mixed forests of the same altitude. And this too is fast depleting with the developmental fallouts of road-making, tourism and construction…

But even in this fast diminishing forest there is no lack of variety…. one just needs to be  appreciative, to realise the beauty of nature…. A good example was our routine weekly foray….

A ladybirds conference happening on a twig.. the difference in the number of spots on a ladybird usually signifies a different species (but not the only identification criterion), and it seems, interesting.. As we walked further, we suddenly spied a good sized ‘Morel‘ mushroom, looking carefully I saw that it was infested with tiny worms.. so wisely we left it to spread it’s spores into the soil for the next harvest (which can take up to five years)… As we move ahead, a white flower stood erect in our path, it  seemed unknown (well new for me at least)… quickly whipping out the ol’ camera I snap off a few shots of this little herb.. about 3 inches in height.. looks very similar to some of the other wild flowers to be found this time of the year… I’ll leave the identification for later.. A fungi growing on a piece of dead wood… looks like a jelly fungi, hmmmm… (will identify it back at home).. and the then on another dead tree nearby there is a slime mold.. growing like  fuzzy candy on a piece of stick.. (of course in a miniature form).. this is called ‘Stemonitis sp.’ difficult to identify properly without a microscope (I satisfy myself with the genus)… AHA.. I sight the white flowers of the ‘wild strawberries’, mmmm I could almost taste the season on my lips as I spy the ‘Wild raspberry’ flowers also growing on a shrub nearby…. And then as we move on… something under the dark underside of a fallen tree catches my eye… (by now I am quite good as spotting something unusual on the wood).. which is usually a bug or a fungi.. This one seems to be a ‘Slime mold‘ again.. could be belonging to the same species as I found earlier.. the ‘Stemonitis’ or there was another one ‘Arcyria’.. I feel quite happy at even having remembered this much.. (going by the fact that I almost failed in my high school science exams)…. Walking along the forest tracks, on a mild sunny day, after a few days of rain seems blissful. It is the time when one finds everything from birds, bees to flowers and mushrooms happily blooming and buzzing… And talking of mushrooms, we find one next to the path… a medium sized, brown colour, I take note of it’s surrounding and keep it in my sample box. Later at home I’d keep the cap on a piece of paper, where it would leave it’s spore prints which help in determining it’s species, next to it we find another mushroom growing on a rotten piece of wood… This has to be a ‘Polypore’, since it has pores on it’s underside. Great…!!! As we go further, I felt like chirping with the birds, but before I could let my euphoric yodelling echo in the mountains….. we find another mushroom…. and this one looks simply too good…. shaped like a cup, it is aptly called as the ‘Devil’s urn’…. It has been a fruitful day.. and not finished as yet… The paths are lined with the ‘Gerbera Daisy’ a flower from the ‘Aster’ family, and they look so beautiful…!! Around in the forest, I also sighted the ‘May Apple’ flowering, which I think is called so, be cause around the month of May it will bear large red fruits, and thus the name… The forests are full of wondrous things.. and once my eyes opened to these wonders, it became like a playground…. Now we sight a big silverish growth on a dead Cedar tree… a close examination and a conference before we decided that it was not a nest but a fungi of some kind…. and of course later we found it was a species of ‘slime molds’…. And then we decide to take a rest on the grassy patch in front of us… but here too, a butterfly (an ‘Indian Red Admiral’), decides to come and check if we are worthy place to sit and sun itself.. and sits on my knee contentedly while I click away… and then my attention wonders away to a small lump of white which seems to be moving, examining it closely, we found a small bug carrying it’s food/house (don’t know) on it’s back…. will wonders never cease, I think as we move back towards our home… but even in this last leg of our walk we come across a mushroom colony on a decaying trunk… doing their task of re-cycling the waste in nature.. and for the last time that day I again sit down next to the trunk, photographing what I know to be a species of the Coprinoid mushrooms…

Back home after a whole day in the forest, tired but happy, I set aside the material for research and identification… the walk providing not only breath of fresh air and exercise.. but also the opportunity to study and learn about these life forms co-existing with us on this earth. I know that after this where ever I might live.. I’ll always be aware and looking out for the beauty of nature… be it in desert, mountains, seas… where ever…..

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